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Department:
Oral Biology
Concentrations:
Accepting Students
Yes
Accepting Students if
Funding Obtained
Yes
Last Updated
6/15/2020
Research Description
Bacteria-Host Interactions, Systemic infections, Oral infections, Intracellular Bacteria, Biofilms, bacterial genetics and physiology
Department:
Pediatrics
Concentrations:
Accepting Students
Yes
Accepting Students if
Funding Obtained
No
Last Updated
6/16/2020
Research Description
Sumita Bhaduri-McIntosh is a physician-scientist whose research bridges the fields of Virology, Oncology and Immunology. Research in the Bhaduri laboratory is focused on discovering fundamental biological pathways and understanding cancer development and progression by studying the interaction between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV; a cancer-causing herpesvirus) and its host, the B cell, by investigating two main areas: 1) investigating how EBV subverts anti-pathogen and anti-cancer barriers such as immune responses and the DNA-damage response (DDR) to drive B cell proliferation and transformation, and 2) identifying host factors that determine susceptibility of EBV-infected B cells to lytic activation, a process important for herpesvirus pathology and persistence in humans, and for lymphomagenesis.
Department:
Pathology, Immunology & Laboratory Medicine
Concentrations:
Accepting Students
Yes
Accepting Students if
Funding Obtained
Yes
Last Updated
6/16/2020
Research Description
Regulation of immunity & autoimmunity; prediction, intervention, and treatment for type 1 diabetes. The lab is focused on the mechanisms by which regulatory T cells maintain peripheral immune tolerance in the context of type 1 diabetes.
Department:
Oral Biology
Concentrations:
Accepting Students
Yes
Accepting Students if
Funding Obtained
Yes
Last Updated
6/16/2020
Research Description
The primary goal of the human microbiome project is to increase our understanding of the structure and function of our microbiota and to elucidate their role in health and predisposition to disease. One of the best-understood human-associated microbial systems is the oral microbiome. The Davey lab uses a combination of molecular genetics, bacterial physiology, and biochemical techniques to study the oral microbiome. In particular, we are focused on the regulator mechanisms (environmental and interspecies signals) that control the pathogenic state of the oral anaerobe, Porphyromonas gingivalis.

Brad E. Hoffman, Ph.D.

Department:
Pediatrics
Concentrations:
Accepting Students
Yes
Accepting Students if
Funding Obtained
Yes
Last Updated
6/16/2020
Research Description
My research group investigates immune modulation and tolerance induction using adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene therapy. We are currently developing an AAV gene immunotherapy that is capable of selectively inducing of antigen-specific regulatory T-cells (Tregs) as a means to treat/reverse autoimmune disease.
Department:
Oral Biology
Concentrations:
Accepting Students
Yes
Accepting Students if
Funding Obtained
Yes
Last Updated
6/15/2020
Research Description
My Laboratory investigates the molecular factors that promote virulence in the opportunistic Gram-positive pathogens Streptococcus mutans and Enterococcus faecalis. S. mutans is a major pathogen in dental caries and a leading causative agent of infective endocarditis. In S. mutans, our current efforts focus on the characterization of the Spx global regulator, and its role in controlling stress responses and biofilm formation. The second S. mutans project, in collaboration with Dr. Jacqueline Abranches, focuses on the characterization of a collagen binding protein responsible for intracellular invasion of human heart and oral tissues, a trait that is potentially linked to increased virulence, recurrent infection and chronic inflammation. The characterization of stress responses is also the theme of our research with E. faecalis, a leading cause of hospital-acquired infections. In this project, we are investigating the interplay between the stringent response, a major bacterial stress response mechanism for adaptation to changing environments, with other prominent stress regulators and how these interactions influence the ability of E. feacalis to survive under adverse conditions.
Department:
Medicine
Concentrations:
Accepting Students
Yes
Accepting Students if
Funding Obtained
No
Last Updated
6/30/2020
Research Description
My group uses sophisticated in vitro and murine infection models to develop regimens for investigational and marketed antibiotics that maximize the killing of bacterial “superbugs” and prevent other bacteria from becoming “superbugs.” The interaction of the immune system with antibiotic(s) to kill microbes is also evaluated.
Department:
Oral Biology
Concentrations:
Accepting Students
Yes
Accepting Students if
Funding Obtained
Yes
Last Updated
6/15/2020
Research Description
My research focuses on elucidating the mechanisms of brain invasion by the AIDS-associated encapsulated fungus Cryptococcus neoformans and the interactions of this eukaryotic microbe with cells of the central nervous system including microglia, astrocytes, and neurons.
Department:
Medicine
Concentrations:
Accepting Students
Yes
Accepting Students if
Funding Obtained
No
Last Updated
6/15/2020
Research Description
Our lab studies mechanisms of lung immune response and repair in the context of infectious and non-infectious injury.
Department:
Infectious Diseases and Immunology
Concentrations:
Accepting Students
Yes
Accepting Students if
Funding Obtained
Yes
Last Updated
6/15/2020
Research Description
Intestinal disorders (IBD, colon cancer) and infectious diseases transcriptomic and metabolic machinery of intestinal innate and T cells during steady state and intestinal infection
Department:
Pathology, Immunology & Laboratory Medicine
Concentrations:
Accepting Students
Yes
Accepting Students if
Funding Obtained
Yes
Last Updated
6/15/2020
Research Description
Genetic analysis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) susceptibility using mouse models, immune metabolism and use of metabolic inhibitors to treat lupus Microbiome and lupus
Department:
Oral Biology
Concentrations:
Accepting Students
Yes
Accepting Students if
Funding Obtained
No
Last Updated
6/15/2020
Research Description
The Papp laboratory focuses on discovering genome-wide molecular mechanisms that control the identity of cells. Cell fate changes naturally during development and during regeneration. Deregulation of cellular fate can also occur due to environmental exposures, host-pathogen interactions. These genome-wide alterations can cause human diseases, including developmental disorders, inflammatory conditions, cancer. By defining circuits of critical transcription factors, signaling pathways and epigenetic regulators contributing to cell fate changes, we aim to find novel targets for therapies. Our approach is to (i) first perform an unbiased genome-wide study in order to (ii) identify key novel regulators, (iii) which are then explored by functional studies and additional genome-wide approaches to create mechanistic models. To this end, we apply state-of-the-art genomics, single-cell imaging, functional genetics and biochemistry.

Liya Pi, Ph.D.

Department:
Pediatrics
Concentrations:
Accepting Students
Yes
Accepting Students if
Funding Obtained
No
Last Updated
7/8/2020
Research Description
Dr. Pi’s expertise is in patho-physiology of the liver, with research goals of identifying molecular targets for anti-fibrotic therapy in order to improve regeneration outcome after liver injury. To this end, her lab is focused on connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and its signal partners, and testing whether targeting these molecules has anti-fibrotic potentials to inhibit action of transforming growth factor (TGF)-ß in preclinical models.
Department:
Medicine
Concentrations:
Accepting Students
Yes
Accepting Students if
Funding Obtained
No
Last Updated
6/30/2020
Research Description
Pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus in humans and animal models. Novel disease markers.
Department:
Molecular Genetics & Microbiology
Concentrations:
Accepting Students
Yes
Accepting Students if
Funding Obtained
No
Last Updated
6/16/2020
Research Description
Biology of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV); role of latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) in transcriptional regulation, viral DNA replication, and episomal segregation in latently-infected cells; role of virus-encoded micro RNAs.
Department:
Surgery
Concentrations:
Accepting Students
Yes
Accepting Students if
Funding Obtained
Yes
Last Updated
6/15/2020
Research Description
The lab of Dr. Thomas currently investigates the role of the microbiome in pancreatic carcinogenesis. They were one of the first labs to identify that the intestinal microbiota can accelerate pancreatic cancer progression. Dr. Thomas is a board-certified surgical oncologist who brings clinical and basic science expertise to his research work. Currently the lab is exploring how the microbiota accelerates pancreatic carcinogenesis through modulation of the host immune system. Additionally, they have interest and preliminary data on how diet alters the microbiome to alter pancreatic carcinogenesis as well microbial interactions with chemotherapy that limit its effectiveness in treating this deadly disease.
Department:
Medicine
Concentrations:
Accepting Students
Yes
Accepting Students if
Funding Obtained
Yes
Last Updated
6/16/2020
Research Description
Our current research falls within the general themes of host-pathogen interactions, and is divided into two major areas 1) Molecular studies of HIV and HCV pathogenesis and drug resistance and 2) Ecology of indigenous microbial communities associated with human infections.
Department:
Pathology, Immunology & Laboratory Medicine
Concentrations:
Accepting Students
Yes
Accepting Students if
Funding Obtained
Yes
Last Updated
6/30/2020
Research Description
Primary research interest focuses on the pathogenesis and therapy of breast cancer. The Zhang Lab studies the dynamic interactions between cancer cells and various tumor microenvironment components especially immune cells during the pathogenesis of breast cancer. The goals are to provide strong rationale for novel target identification, novel drug development, and/or formulation of novel treatment regimens for breast cancer patients. In addition, the Lab has broader interest in other cancer types including renal cancer. The lab has been establishing the immune landscaping of renal clear cell carcinomas (RCC) using single cell RNA sequencing/bioinformatics. This leads to several novel discoveries that may explain the sensitivity of RCC to immunotherapy.

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